DreamQuest Games Mentors 4th-10th Graders to Build Their Own Video Games

 
Camp Teams Working
Summary: Students are attending a two-week video game design camp and learning everything that goes into designing and programming a video game. Members of the media are invited to attend the camp at 2:30pm on Friday, June 28th, 2013, and see the students present the games they have created during the camp.

June 25, 2013 (Lafayette, CO) – This summer students from Boulder, CO are taking the first steps toward building what could become the next big independent video game at a unique summer camp under the guidance of programmers at DreamQuest Games. Working with veterans in the game industry with more than 10 years of experience, students are building their own video games and learning about everything that goes into designing, programming, and testing a video game.

“The camp was great. It was better than a lot of other camps because we got to work in teams with Unity, a real game engine,” said Chris P., one of the students. “It was simple and easy to pick up but not limited. You can make a pretty cool game!”

Founder of DreamQuest Games, Christopher Williamson, is inspired to take an active role in cultivating an interest in science and technology in children. He is hosting two more 2-week sessions for students to learn about everything that goes into planning, writing, and developing a video game. “My love of video games led me into creating fun and engaging games for others to enjoy,” Williamson said. “I want to share my enthusiasm for gaming with children that also love video games and help them find a passion for designing and creating their own projects.”

DreamQuest offers the camp to students that have just completed 4th-10th grade and has attendees from Boulder to Broomfield. Field trips to Phobic Studios and Backflip Studios (designers of the very popular Dragonvale iOS game) gave students a full tour of all of the different departments of a major video game studio. In addition to learning about the game industry, students had time to enjoy playing games with each other and relaxing at a pool party. Lunches were spent outside at a nearby park.

“The students worked in small teams on an original game they designed. We give them the tools and training they need as well as guidance in designing, programming, and creating their game from concept to a playable game in only two weeks,” Williamson said. “Honestly, I had some initial doubts that we could have them build a game from scratch in two weeks, but everything has gone tremendously well! Feedback from the students and parents has shown our program has really helped the kids learn valuable skills, build confidence in their ideas, make new friends and have a fun time.”

students in the second session are working on five very different video games: an old-school platformer similar to Super Mario Bros. called Krobbers, a space strategy game called BattleBirds, a casual tower defense game called SkyRaiders, and action-RPG game called MonsterHunter, and a first-person, sci-fi shooter called Planetary Crisis. When camp is finished, students take the games home with them to share with their friends and continue working on their projects. More information on the camp, photos of the camp in action, and games the students created are available at dreamquest.org.

When not working with students on their games, DreamQuest Games creates visually-rich card and board games for PCs, tablets, and smartphones. Williamson’s Championship Spades game was such a hit that he was encouraged to pursue building video games as a full-time endeavor. In its thirteenth year of operation, DreamQuest now has games of Checkers, Chess, Cribbage, Euchre, Five Hundred, Gin, Hearts, Mahjong, Rummy, and Solitaire for Windows, Mac, and iOs and Android tablets and smartphones. The Championship Spades and Championship Hearts games have won many awards including being recognized with 5-star Editor’s Choice ratings from CNet and 5-star Editor’s Pick ratings from Tucows.

Additional Details:
students will be presenting the games they have been creating on Friday, June 25, 2013 at 2:30pm. Members of the media are encouraged to attend the presentations and speak with the students and parents about their experiences.

Contact Information
DreamQuest Academy c/o DreamQuest Games
Christopher Williamson
PO Box 18, Lafayette, CO 80026
303-953-4456 fun@dreamquest.org
https://dreamquest.org http://dreamquestgames.com